AUTISM AND BEHAVIOUR
Chat and helpline for parents of Autistic children
 
 
INTRODUCTION
Behaviour and the Autistic child
 
 
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS FOR PARENTS OF AUTISTIC CHILDREN AND THEIR BEAUTIFUL MINDS
10 Most common questions
 
 
AUTISM TEST FOR ADULTS
 
 
SOME SYMPTOMS OF AUTISM
 
 
A.B.A
Every child is able to learn
 
 
THE PARENT AND ABA
 
 
Some more A.B.A.
 
 
ABA is a fundamental science
 
 
Start Teaching Appropriate Behavior the ABA way
 
 
SEROTONIN IMBALANCES
Observation
 
 
NEUROPLASTISITY AND AUTISM
 
 
MANDING
Rewards
 
 
EYE CONTACT
Research
 
 
THE ILLUSION OF INCLUSION
 
 
LEARN YOUR CHILD TO SIT STILL
 
 
TANTRUMS
Managing tantrums of the child with Neuropsychological disorders
 
 
QUESTIONS ON HEADBANGING
 
 
SOME ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS REGARDING HEADBANGING
 
 
Autism,the importants of early intervention
 
 
MESSAGE FROM A AUTISTIC PERSON
 
 
SOME MORE INTERESTING FACTS
HANNAH'S MIND
 
 
AUTISTIC CHILDREN AND DAY DREAMING
 
 
TO PARENTS OR CARERS OF AUTISTIC CHILDREN--FROM WILLIAMS MOTHER
 
 
WILLIAM 1
A MOTHERS INFORMATION
 
 
WILLIAM
 
 
WILLIAM
 
 
WILLIAM
 
 
POSITIVE REINFORCMENT AND THE AUTISTIC CHILD
 
 
REINFORCEMENT AND THE AUTISTIC CHILD
 
 
Need for Sameness and Difficulty With Transitions:
 
 
ELIMINATING PERFORMANCE DEFICITS
 
 
TIPS ON STARTING VERBAL IMITATION
 
 
WE LABEL OUR CHILDREN TO EASILY
 
 
AUTISM AND PARENTAL STRESS
 
 
Problem Behaviour
 
 
INTENSIVE TEACHING AND NET
 
 
WHAT WE SUSPECTED NOW PROVED BEYOND DOUBT
 
 
VBA WORKS ANOTHER SUCCESS STORY
 
 
TREATMENT OPTIONS OF AUTISM
 
 
MEDICATION AND AUTISM
 
 
UNDERSTANDING A.B.A.
 
 
LINK BETWEEN AUTISM AND OXIDATIVE STRESS
 
 
Questions of a concerned parent
 
 
NEGATIVE BEHAVIOURS AND THE AUTISTIC CHILD
 
 
Page 146
 
 
Behaviour
 
 
TEACHING AND TRAINING S.E.N (SOMETIMES A DISGRACE?)
 
 
IF YOU WANT, READ MORE FACTS ON WILLIAM 1
AUTISM CAN BE MANAGE JUST ANOTHER PROOF FROM DENISE
 
 
When Nerve Cells Can't Make Contact
 
 
Some Educational Approaches
 
 
CHILDREN NOT COMPLYING
 
 
SSRI`S SEROTONIN AND AUTISM
 
 
RISPREDAL AND AUTISM
 
 
TEACHERS EDUCATE YOURSELF
 
 
LATEST RESEARCH
 
 
HOW TO REINFORCE CORRECT RESPONSES
 
 
SOME TEACHING TIPS
 
 
BEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION
 
 
REINFORCEMENT
 
 
All SEN Schools should have a Policy for Provision for Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder
 
 
A WONDERFULL LETTER FROM WILLIAMS MUM
 
 
A PARENTS VIEW OF HER CHILDS EDUCATION
IT IS SAD BUT IN SO MANY CASES TRUE.
 
 
AUTISM LANGUAGE AND BEHAVIOUR
AUTISM MADE EASY
 
 
ABA and ASHLEY`S mother
 
 
SOME NEUROLOGICAL FACTS
 
 
MORE REINFORCEMENTS TO ENJOY YOUR AUTISTIC CHILD
 
 
UNDERSTANDING BEHAVIOUR
 
 
EDUCATIONAL APPROACHES
 
 
How Does Autism Affect a Child?
 
 
Rationale for the Verbal Behavior Approach
 
 
Emotional behaviour and neurotypical children
 
 
Video
 
 
LATEST RESEARCH
 
 
TEACHING THE CHILD WITH ASPERGER SYNDROME
 
 
Children With Oppositional Defiant Disorder
 
 
Autism and Human Evolution
 
 
TWO AUTISM TEACHING TIPS
 
 
Page 122
 
 
TONY BLAIR AND AUTISM
 
 
EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCES AND PROBLEM BEHAVIOUR IN CHILDREN
 
 
EMOTIONS
 
 
Last Updated: Thursday, 26 April 2007, 00:04 GMT 01:04 UK
 
 
FOR TEACHERS
 
 
Neurons
 
 
Children with autism can't discern
 
 
The cause of autism - can it be the malfunction or lack of mirror neurons?
 
 
EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCES AND PROBLEM BEHAVIOUR IN CHILDREN
 
 
DISCRETE TRIAL TRAINING
 
 
POPULAR PROGRAMS FOR TEACHING AUTISM
 
 
ESTABLISHING BEHAVIORAL CONTROL IN EVERYDAY LIFE SITUATIONS
 
 
What every Teacher and Parent should know about D.T.T.
 
 
The teacher and ABA
 
 
THE BRAIN MADE EASY
 
 
Some tips on extinction of bad behaviour
 
 
Autistic Brains Can Be Trained To Recognize Visual And Vocal Cues, A Study First For UCLA
 
 
ABA,TEACHH AND OTHER AUTISM INTERVENTIONS
 
 
Autism and Flexability
 
 
NEWS ABOUT AUTISM IN UK
 
 
Autism and the meaning of conversation
 
 
Neuroplasticity, Autism and Depression
 
 
VIDEO ON NEUROPLASTICITY
 
 
AUTISM, DEPRESSION AND O.C.D.
 
 
NEW AUTISM
 
 
Neuroplasticity and human walking
 
 
Autism and work compliance
 
 
Neuroplasticity and Reorganization of Brain Functioning.
 
 
AUTISM AND U.K. POLICY---AT LAST SOME DIRECTIONS
 
 
Eliminating Aggressive Behaviour in Children
 
 
LATEST RESEARCH
 
 
AUTISM NEWS IN U.K.
 
 
BEHAVIOURAL INTERVENTION
 
 
Abnormal Adaptive Face-Coding Mechanisms in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
 
 
ESTABLISHING BEHAVIOURAL CONTROL IN EVERYDAY LIFE SITUATIONS
 
 
Beginning a Verbal Behaviour Program
 
 
NEURONS
 
 
Program for echolalia
 
 
ESTABLISHING BEHAVIOURAL CONTROL IN EVERYDAY LIFE SITUATIONS
 
 
Elevated rates of testosterone- related disorders in women with autism spectrum conditions.
 
 
ANXIETY AND AUTISM
 
 
To prompt appropriately
 
 
HOW TO TEACH AUTISTIC CHILDREN-BASIC Teaching Strategies
 
 
TWO HALVES OF THE BRAIN
 
 
Teach your son to ask
 
 
TESTOSTERONE AND AUTISM
 
 
Autism and escape mechanism
 
 
ABA/VB AND TEACHH
A LETTER FROM A PARENT
 
 
Intelligence and the autistic child-YOU MUST READ THIS
 
 
Early intervention, the autistic brain and Neuroplasticity
 
 
The Amagdyla, Autism and emotions
 
 
RAPAMYCIN A BREAKTHROUGH FOR AUTISM?
 
 
Protein associated with neurons
 
 
Pro- and anti-social behaviour of the Autistic child
 
 
Oppositional Defiant Disorder
 
 
Six Principles of Behaviour Management
 
 
Autism Toxins AND gastrointestinal function
 
 
Parents conversation
 
 
UNBELIEVABLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
 
Schizophrenia and autism
 
 
Social skills and children with ASD
 
 
The Autistic “Teacher”
 
 
Autism and An effective classroom of diverse learning
 
 
Behaviour, Autism and the Neurological Impaired child
 
 
Autism and extinction-To Robert
 
 
Autism and Emotions
 
 
How to approach the child and bad behaviour
 
 
THE AMYGDALA AND AUTISM
 
 
Behaviour Management
 
 
Autism and holidays
survey
 
 
Conversation on behavior
 
 
A DEVELOPMENTAL CURRICULUM FOR CHILDREN WITH SLD AND SEVERE ASD
 
 
Gene linked to causes of autism
 
 
The Ticket system for children with S.E.N.
A SHORT EXPLANATION
 
 
Part teacher,Part counselor and Part parent
 
 
Reinforcing Responses that is correct
 
 
BEHAVIOUR OF YOUR CHILD DO YOU UNDERSTAND IT?
 
 
THE CHILD AND POSITIVE DISCIPLINE
 
 
Managing Hostile-Aggressive Behaviour
 
 
Running from the Classroom
 
 
CONVERSATION ON BEHAVIOUR AND AUTISM
 
 
A mother's emotional description of her Autistic child that should reflect all of our feelings as parents
 
 
Escape Behaviour in the classroom
 
 
EARLY SYMPTOMS OF THE CHILD WITH AUTISM
 
 
AN OVERVIEW ON AUTISM
 
 
BEHAVIOUR IN CHILDREN
DO YOU UNDERSTAND IT OR EVENYOUR OWN
 
 
Ten things I wish you knew
 
 
How must I teach my Autistic/SLD child
An approach to help teaching the Autistic/SLD child
 
 
Communication Problems In The Brain
 
 
WILLIAM
A Mother's comments on her Autistic son
 
 
BACKCHAT WHAT MUST I DO?
 
 
CHILDREN AND VERBAL ABUSE
 
 
BEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION THE BASICS
 
 
Early identification of ASD
 
 
Autism Listen to me
A personal view of an Autistic person
 
 
THE MISBEHAVING CHILD
WHY DO CHILDREN PLAY UP IN SCHOOL
 
 
BEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION AND THE ADHD CHILD
 
 
THE CHILD AND VERBAL ABUSE
 
 
IS MY CHILD MISBEHAVING?
 
 
REDUCE AND TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR CHILDS PROBLEMATIC BEHAVIOUR
 
 
NEUROPLASTICITY AND THE HUMAN BRAIN
 
 
BBEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION AND THE ADHD CHILD
 
 
Autism-Deciphering a Mystery
 
 
LETTER FROM A PARENT
WE SOMETIMES DO HELP
 
 
CHANGING YOUR CHILD'S BEHAVIOUR
 
 
Activities of Daily Life and the child with severe learning disabilities
 
 
Autism and S.L.D Behaviour Modification Techniques
 
 
Autism and S.L.D Behaviour Modification Techniques
 
 
TEACHERS BEWARE WILL YOUR SCHOOL BACK YOU?
 
 
ERRORLESS LEARNING
 
 
What do I do with a ADHD boy in my class
 
 
Neurotransmitter deficiencies and ADHD
 
 
LIFE SKILLS AND THE S.E.N.CHILD
 
 
BEHAVIOUR AND ASPERGERS
 
 
Behaviour and sugar intake
 
 
Social development and Behaviour for children with Cognitive impairments
 
 
The Teenage Brain
 
 
Severe Autism ,Cognitive Impairment and communication
 
 
DO WE FAIL OUR CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS?
 
 
Instructional control as a method of behaviour .This can also be used with the Autistic child
 
 
TEST FOR ADD
 
 
Pro- and anti-social behaviour of the Autistic child
 
 
Behavioural and Educational Intervention Programs for children with ASD
 
 
BEHAVIOR= MOVEMENT AND OUTCOME
 
 
THE IMPORTANCE OF BEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION AND SENSORY INTEGRATION IN THE CURICULUM OF THE S.L.D.CHILD WITH ANGELMANS
 
 
Attachment Disorder
 
 
CLASSROOM BEHAVIOUR
CLASSROOM BEHAVIOUR
 
 
TEACHING THE ANGELMANS CHILD
 
 
Ethological difference between walking and typing
 
 
The Teenage Brain and how it works
 
 
WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT EDUCATING THE C HILD WITH ANGELMANS SYNDROME
 
 
What parents want teachers and administrators to know about students with Angelman syndrome:
 
 
Mathematics or memory?
 
 
UNDERSTANDING HOW THE BRAIN WORKS
 
 
Behaviour and Creativity
 
 
Distinct Developmental Patterns Identified During The First 3 Years of the Autistic Child
 
 
Modern medicine and Autism
 
 
Pets and Autism
Children with Autism bond with animals
 
 

Severe Autism ,Cognitive Impairment and communication

Severe Autism ,Cognitive Impairment and communication

Individuals who are labelled as having a severe autism with cognitive impairment are individuals who have greater difficulty with social skills, and academic performance. They often have few readily known and/or socially appropriate means for communicating with others. It should not be surprising then, that these individuals may easily exhibit challenging behaviours, such as self-injury and aggression. This may be because they simply have not learned a better way of reacting or coping with the demands of daily stressors, or may have no better means for communicating with others.

Children with severe autism may also engage in more sensory-related activities such as hand flapping, spinning, or rocking. People with severe autism usually do not speak, often do not understand receptive language, do not care nor do they wish to engage in conversation unless it is absolutely necessary and it is extremely limited due to the lack of speech, do not respond well to behavioural therapy, and do not show a great deal of improvement. For children with low functioning autism being mentally challenge is common, epilepsy is common, and other disorders may be present as well. They do not express emotions (except anger) and whether they experience those emotions is unknown due to their inability to communicate.

Low Functioning vs. High Functioning

Autism presents in a wide degree, from those who are nearly socially impaired and apparently mentally handicapped to those whose symptoms are mild or improved enough to appear ordinarily ("normal") to the general public. In terms of both classification and therapy, autistic individuals are often divided into those with an IQ<80 referred to as having "low-functioning autism" (LFA), while those with IQ>80 are referred to as having "high-functioning autism" (HFA). Low and high functioning are more commonly applied to how well an individual can accomplish activities of daily living, rather than to IQ. The terms low and high functioning in autism are controversial and not all people living with autism accept these labels. The number of people diagnosed with severe autism is not rising quite as sharply as mild autism, indicating that at least part of the explanation for the apparent rise is probably better diagnostics.

Children with low-functioning autism are more likely to be mentally challenged or have epilepsy and might have extremely limited receptive/expressive language skills. On the other hand, students with the label of severe disabilities can possess exceptional talents. In other words, students labelled as high-functioning may be severely disabled by their autism. And those who are labelled as low- functioning may be less affected by the characteristics associated with autism. People can be said to have "low-functioning autism" or "high-functioning autism," depending upon the severity of their symptoms and the results of an IQ (intelligence) test. Even though classification of individuals by IQ test scores have endured 20 years of criticism, educators still tend to further classify students into the following categories:

1. Educable (IQ 70 - 55)
2. Trainable (IQ 55 - 40)
3. Severe (IQ 40 - 25)
4. Profound (IQ below 25)

Classification of mentally challenged is measured by IQ score and has four levels: mild, moderate, severe, and profound. Educators use these categories for the intention of curriculum development, classroom placement, and teacher certification. These terms are mainly stereotypical and unfavourable.

More Common Traits in Low Functioning / Severe Autism

• Hand-wringing
• Appearance of poorly coordinated manner of walking / stepping
• Severely impaired expressive and receptive language development
• Lack of or infrequent initiation
• Lack of usual nonverbal gestures (i.e., pointing, head shake, nod)
• Unable to control improper behaviour
• Avoids or uses eye contact in odd ways
• Prefers to be alone
• Inability to imitate (body movement, vocal, motor)
• Engages in rhythmic body movements such as rocking, pacing, hand flapping, toe walking, spinning
• Over- and under-sensitivity to sound, smell, touch, visual stimulus and pain
• May not be seek physical comfort from parents/caregiver
• Unusual display of emotion, for example, giggling or weeping for no apparent reason
• Impulsive
• Unwillingness
• Aggressive behaviour
• Self-injurious behaviour

Education for Low Functioning Autism

Limited grammar and an impulsive sensitivity to stimulus are often thought to be typical of low-functioning autism, as is a strong visual processing preference. When designing educational programs for students with autism labelled as severely disabled, professionals and family members are advised to consider that programs for a particular student is to be specifically determined through the individualized education program (IEP) process. There is no IEP for people who are low-functioning versus people who are high-functioning. There are only IEPs for each individual student. Individualized programs must explain approaches for providing the student with acceptable and understandable ways of communication, teaching situation-appropriate social behaviours, and providing experiences that satisfy sensory needs by promoting desensitisation or reducing sensory overload in specific settings and situations.

If a child with severe autism has greater difficulty learning, then the crucial school years should be spent teaching him/her to participate in beneficial activities. A functional living curriculum is various activities the person will need in order to live, work, and participate in his/her community. Life skills such as balancing a check book, eating at a restaurant, maintaining a job, and shopping are vital goals. Parents of those children who are perceived as low functioning autism must advocate the need for such living activities in the child’s IEP. Many children with autism are grouped in programs relating on the level of functioning and disabilities instead of their abilities. There is no set label or curriculum which fits all students with autism; no precise placement. What children learn in school should express their diversity of preferences.

Behaviour & emotional problems - Children with mental challenges are more likely to exhibit behaviour and emotional problems than their peers. Rejection often results from peers' perception of the inappropriate nature of explicit behaviour rather than academic incompetence. Therefore, the teachers should emphasize integration efforts and focus on the need for instruction in social skills and social competence. Cooperative learning strategies can be very effective.

Concrete concepts - Students with mild mental disabilities work better with physical concepts rather than with thinking, have difficulty with short-term memory and in organizing information for later recall, and find it difficult to simplify to a variety of situations.

Achievement - Academically, low functioning children lag behind in achievement for their age expectations. Typically, students with mental challenges are three to four years behind their peers without disabilities and may manage from a second- to a sixth-grade level of achievement upon completion of formal education.

Locus of control theory - is a concept in between psychology and sociology, related to where individuals approach responsibility, choice, and control for events in their lives. It distinguishes between two common paths which place the actual control either internal or external to the person themselves. This decision, which is not usually within conscious awareness, strongly influences motivation and a sense of self direction and psychological integrity on the one hand (if seen as something outside the control of the person themselves), and supports notions of helplessness, blame, and lack of psychological potency. Train children with autism to be aware of the importance of attention and to learn how to actively monitor its occurrence in his or her own learning efforts. The concept of attention can be broken down into attention span (length of time on task); focus (to restrain from distracting or unforeseen stimuli); and selective attention (the discrimination of important stimulus characteristics).

Physical problems - Physically, some children with mild mental disabilities are below average in height, weight, and skeletal maturity. Many of these children display coinciding physical problems.

Functional skills - Students with mild mental challenges can reach academic goals, even though it may take them longer than other students to do so. Children with severe autism can acquire basic communication skills, both oral and written. The teacher should emphasize functional achievement (adaptive skills) that will help students become financially and socially independent adults. Frequent practice and reinforcement can help students acquire appropriate social response acquisition.

Speech processes – The use of a speech therapist can help children in problem solving, retention, or recall if the child is selective verbal

Children with low-functioning autism do not control their behaviour while out in public. They can be violent and for no apparent reason, to the rest of us, attack someone and then passive again a few minutes later. These children do not acquire the communication necessary for holding a conversation with strangers, and the skills therapists provide is very limited. There has been surprisingly little research investigating the causes for the language and learning difficulties in low functioning autism. About half of all autistic children are MUTE, and those who speak often only repeat what they have heard. It is estimated that fifty present of individuals with autism develop purposeful communicative language.

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