AUTISM AND BEHAVIOUR
Chat and helpline for parents of Autistic children
 
 
INTRODUCTION
Behaviour and the Autistic child
 
 
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS FOR PARENTS OF AUTISTIC CHILDREN AND THEIR BEAUTIFUL MINDS
10 Most common questions
 
 
AUTISM TEST FOR ADULTS
 
 
SOME SYMPTOMS OF AUTISM
 
 
A.B.A
Every child is able to learn
 
 
THE PARENT AND ABA
 
 
Some more A.B.A.
 
 
ABA is a fundamental science
 
 
Start Teaching Appropriate Behavior the ABA way
 
 
SEROTONIN IMBALANCES
Observation
 
 
NEUROPLASTISITY AND AUTISM
 
 
MANDING
Rewards
 
 
EYE CONTACT
Research
 
 
THE ILLUSION OF INCLUSION
 
 
LEARN YOUR CHILD TO SIT STILL
 
 
TANTRUMS
Managing tantrums of the child with Neuropsychological disorders
 
 
QUESTIONS ON HEADBANGING
 
 
SOME ANSWERS ON QUESTIONS REGARDING HEADBANGING
 
 
Autism,the importants of early intervention
 
 
MESSAGE FROM A AUTISTIC PERSON
 
 
SOME MORE INTERESTING FACTS
HANNAH'S MIND
 
 
AUTISTIC CHILDREN AND DAY DREAMING
 
 
TO PARENTS OR CARERS OF AUTISTIC CHILDREN--FROM WILLIAMS MOTHER
 
 
WILLIAM 1
A MOTHERS INFORMATION
 
 
WILLIAM
 
 
WILLIAM
 
 
WILLIAM
 
 
POSITIVE REINFORCMENT AND THE AUTISTIC CHILD
 
 
REINFORCEMENT AND THE AUTISTIC CHILD
 
 
Need for Sameness and Difficulty With Transitions:
 
 
ELIMINATING PERFORMANCE DEFICITS
 
 
TIPS ON STARTING VERBAL IMITATION
 
 
WE LABEL OUR CHILDREN TO EASILY
 
 
AUTISM AND PARENTAL STRESS
 
 
Problem Behaviour
 
 
INTENSIVE TEACHING AND NET
 
 
WHAT WE SUSPECTED NOW PROVED BEYOND DOUBT
 
 
VBA WORKS ANOTHER SUCCESS STORY
 
 
TREATMENT OPTIONS OF AUTISM
 
 
MEDICATION AND AUTISM
 
 
UNDERSTANDING A.B.A.
 
 
LINK BETWEEN AUTISM AND OXIDATIVE STRESS
 
 
Questions of a concerned parent
 
 
NEGATIVE BEHAVIOURS AND THE AUTISTIC CHILD
 
 
Page 146
 
 
Behaviour
 
 
TEACHING AND TRAINING S.E.N (SOMETIMES A DISGRACE?)
 
 
IF YOU WANT, READ MORE FACTS ON WILLIAM 1
AUTISM CAN BE MANAGE JUST ANOTHER PROOF FROM DENISE
 
 
When Nerve Cells Can't Make Contact
 
 
Some Educational Approaches
 
 
CHILDREN NOT COMPLYING
 
 
SSRI`S SEROTONIN AND AUTISM
 
 
RISPREDAL AND AUTISM
 
 
TEACHERS EDUCATE YOURSELF
 
 
LATEST RESEARCH
 
 
HOW TO REINFORCE CORRECT RESPONSES
 
 
SOME TEACHING TIPS
 
 
BEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION
 
 
REINFORCEMENT
 
 
All SEN Schools should have a Policy for Provision for Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder
 
 
A WONDERFULL LETTER FROM WILLIAMS MUM
 
 
A PARENTS VIEW OF HER CHILDS EDUCATION
IT IS SAD BUT IN SO MANY CASES TRUE.
 
 
AUTISM LANGUAGE AND BEHAVIOUR
AUTISM MADE EASY
 
 
ABA and ASHLEY`S mother
 
 
SOME NEUROLOGICAL FACTS
 
 
MORE REINFORCEMENTS TO ENJOY YOUR AUTISTIC CHILD
 
 
UNDERSTANDING BEHAVIOUR
 
 
EDUCATIONAL APPROACHES
 
 
How Does Autism Affect a Child?
 
 
Rationale for the Verbal Behavior Approach
 
 
Emotional behaviour and neurotypical children
 
 
Video
 
 
LATEST RESEARCH
 
 
TEACHING THE CHILD WITH ASPERGER SYNDROME
 
 
Children With Oppositional Defiant Disorder
 
 
Autism and Human Evolution
 
 
TWO AUTISM TEACHING TIPS
 
 
Page 122
 
 
TONY BLAIR AND AUTISM
 
 
EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCES AND PROBLEM BEHAVIOUR IN CHILDREN
 
 
EMOTIONS
 
 
Last Updated: Thursday, 26 April 2007, 00:04 GMT 01:04 UK
 
 
FOR TEACHERS
 
 
Neurons
 
 
Children with autism can't discern
 
 
The cause of autism - can it be the malfunction or lack of mirror neurons?
 
 
EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCES AND PROBLEM BEHAVIOUR IN CHILDREN
 
 
DISCRETE TRIAL TRAINING
 
 
POPULAR PROGRAMS FOR TEACHING AUTISM
 
 
ESTABLISHING BEHAVIORAL CONTROL IN EVERYDAY LIFE SITUATIONS
 
 
What every Teacher and Parent should know about D.T.T.
 
 
The teacher and ABA
 
 
THE BRAIN MADE EASY
 
 
Some tips on extinction of bad behaviour
 
 
Autistic Brains Can Be Trained To Recognize Visual And Vocal Cues, A Study First For UCLA
 
 
ABA,TEACHH AND OTHER AUTISM INTERVENTIONS
 
 
Autism and Flexability
 
 
NEWS ABOUT AUTISM IN UK
 
 
Autism and the meaning of conversation
 
 
Neuroplasticity, Autism and Depression
 
 
VIDEO ON NEUROPLASTICITY
 
 
AUTISM, DEPRESSION AND O.C.D.
 
 
NEW AUTISM
 
 
Neuroplasticity and human walking
 
 
Autism and work compliance
 
 
Neuroplasticity and Reorganization of Brain Functioning.
 
 
AUTISM AND U.K. POLICY---AT LAST SOME DIRECTIONS
 
 
Eliminating Aggressive Behaviour in Children
 
 
LATEST RESEARCH
 
 
AUTISM NEWS IN U.K.
 
 
BEHAVIOURAL INTERVENTION
 
 
Abnormal Adaptive Face-Coding Mechanisms in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
 
 
ESTABLISHING BEHAVIOURAL CONTROL IN EVERYDAY LIFE SITUATIONS
 
 
Beginning a Verbal Behaviour Program
 
 
NEURONS
 
 
Program for echolalia
 
 
ESTABLISHING BEHAVIOURAL CONTROL IN EVERYDAY LIFE SITUATIONS
 
 
Elevated rates of testosterone- related disorders in women with autism spectrum conditions.
 
 
ANXIETY AND AUTISM
 
 
To prompt appropriately
 
 
HOW TO TEACH AUTISTIC CHILDREN-BASIC Teaching Strategies
 
 
TWO HALVES OF THE BRAIN
 
 
Teach your son to ask
 
 
TESTOSTERONE AND AUTISM
 
 
Autism and escape mechanism
 
 
ABA/VB AND TEACHH
A LETTER FROM A PARENT
 
 
Intelligence and the autistic child-YOU MUST READ THIS
 
 
Early intervention, the autistic brain and Neuroplasticity
 
 
The Amagdyla, Autism and emotions
 
 
RAPAMYCIN A BREAKTHROUGH FOR AUTISM?
 
 
Protein associated with neurons
 
 
Pro- and anti-social behaviour of the Autistic child
 
 
Oppositional Defiant Disorder
 
 
Six Principles of Behaviour Management
 
 
Autism Toxins AND gastrointestinal function
 
 
Parents conversation
 
 
UNBELIEVABLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
 
Schizophrenia and autism
 
 
Social skills and children with ASD
 
 
The Autistic “Teacher”
 
 
Autism and An effective classroom of diverse learning
 
 
Behaviour, Autism and the Neurological Impaired child
 
 
Autism and extinction-To Robert
 
 
Autism and Emotions
 
 
How to approach the child and bad behaviour
 
 
THE AMYGDALA AND AUTISM
 
 
Behaviour Management
 
 
Autism and holidays
survey
 
 
Conversation on behavior
 
 
A DEVELOPMENTAL CURRICULUM FOR CHILDREN WITH SLD AND SEVERE ASD
 
 
Gene linked to causes of autism
 
 
The Ticket system for children with S.E.N.
A SHORT EXPLANATION
 
 
Part teacher,Part counselor and Part parent
 
 
Reinforcing Responses that is correct
 
 
BEHAVIOUR OF YOUR CHILD DO YOU UNDERSTAND IT?
 
 
THE CHILD AND POSITIVE DISCIPLINE
 
 
Managing Hostile-Aggressive Behaviour
 
 
Running from the Classroom
 
 
CONVERSATION ON BEHAVIOUR AND AUTISM
 
 
A mother's emotional description of her Autistic child that should reflect all of our feelings as parents
 
 
Escape Behaviour in the classroom
 
 
EARLY SYMPTOMS OF THE CHILD WITH AUTISM
 
 
AN OVERVIEW ON AUTISM
 
 
BEHAVIOUR IN CHILDREN
DO YOU UNDERSTAND IT OR EVENYOUR OWN
 
 
Ten things I wish you knew
 
 
How must I teach my Autistic/SLD child
An approach to help teaching the Autistic/SLD child
 
 
Communication Problems In The Brain
 
 
WILLIAM
A Mother's comments on her Autistic son
 
 
BACKCHAT WHAT MUST I DO?
 
 
CHILDREN AND VERBAL ABUSE
 
 
BEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION THE BASICS
 
 
Early identification of ASD
 
 
Autism Listen to me
A personal view of an Autistic person
 
 
THE MISBEHAVING CHILD
WHY DO CHILDREN PLAY UP IN SCHOOL
 
 
BEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION AND THE ADHD CHILD
 
 
THE CHILD AND VERBAL ABUSE
 
 
IS MY CHILD MISBEHAVING?
 
 
REDUCE AND TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR CHILDS PROBLEMATIC BEHAVIOUR
 
 
NEUROPLASTICITY AND THE HUMAN BRAIN
 
 
BBEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION AND THE ADHD CHILD
 
 
Autism-Deciphering a Mystery
 
 
LETTER FROM A PARENT
WE SOMETIMES DO HELP
 
 
CHANGING YOUR CHILD'S BEHAVIOUR
 
 
Activities of Daily Life and the child with severe learning disabilities
 
 
Autism and S.L.D Behaviour Modification Techniques
 
 
Autism and S.L.D Behaviour Modification Techniques
 
 
TEACHERS BEWARE WILL YOUR SCHOOL BACK YOU?
 
 
ERRORLESS LEARNING
 
 
What do I do with a ADHD boy in my class
 
 
Neurotransmitter deficiencies and ADHD
 
 
LIFE SKILLS AND THE S.E.N.CHILD
 
 
BEHAVIOUR AND ASPERGERS
 
 
Behaviour and sugar intake
 
 
Social development and Behaviour for children with Cognitive impairments
 
 
The Teenage Brain
 
 
Severe Autism ,Cognitive Impairment and communication
 
 
DO WE FAIL OUR CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS?
 
 
Instructional control as a method of behaviour .This can also be used with the Autistic child
 
 
TEST FOR ADD
 
 
Pro- and anti-social behaviour of the Autistic child
 
 
Behavioural and Educational Intervention Programs for children with ASD
 
 
BEHAVIOR= MOVEMENT AND OUTCOME
 
 
THE IMPORTANCE OF BEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION AND SENSORY INTEGRATION IN THE CURICULUM OF THE S.L.D.CHILD WITH ANGELMANS
 
 
Attachment Disorder
 
 
CLASSROOM BEHAVIOUR
CLASSROOM BEHAVIOUR
 
 
TEACHING THE ANGELMANS CHILD
 
 
Ethological difference between walking and typing
 
 
The Teenage Brain and how it works
 
 
WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT EDUCATING THE C HILD WITH ANGELMANS SYNDROME
 
 
What parents want teachers and administrators to know about students with Angelman syndrome:
 
 
Mathematics or memory?
 
 
UNDERSTANDING HOW THE BRAIN WORKS
 
 
Behaviour and Creativity
 
 
Distinct Developmental Patterns Identified During The First 3 Years of the Autistic Child
 
 
Modern medicine and Autism
 
 
Pets and Autism
Children with Autism bond with animals
 
 

THE CHILD AND VERBAL ABUSE

Why do kids threaten and verbally abuse their peers? One reason is that when these children feel powerless, they lash out in an attempt to gain more control. Another reason is that they don’t have the problem-solving skills necessary to deal with frustration, to deal with disappointment or to resolve conflicts in a more appropriate manner. Children may fail to develop social problem-solving skills for a variety of reasons, which include diagnosed and undiagnosed learning disabilities, family chaos, or individual temperament. Consequently, these kids often become overwhelmed by the emotions they’re experiencing as a result of their inability to solve social problems appropriately. If they don’t have the tools to deal with these uncomfortable feelings, they resort to name-calling, threats and verbal abuse of those around them.
It is my firm belief that children also threaten their peers because in our culture today, power has become the solution for the problems people face. That message comes at children from every conceivable source. Movies, music, video games, politics and pro sports glorify aggression and the use of power to get your way. Preteens and adolescents are the most vulnerable to cultural messages, and the message they are getting says that if you’re weak, if you’re alone, you lose. Don’t kid yourself; this is not wasted on our youth. From a very early age, kids are taught that fighting for power and control will solve their problems. And as they get older, that fight becomes a lot more intense.
Now let’s say you have a child who, for whatever reason, has poor problem-solving skills. He sees the message of power around him on T.V., in his community and in his culture. He then learns how to use power in the form of threats and verbal abuse to replace his lack of problem-solving abilities. Instead of having to deal with his emotions and overcome whatever given obstacle is in his path, that child uses acting-out behaviour, aggressive behaviour and abusive behaviour so that somebody else has to solve his problems for him. In effect, using this acting out, aggressive or abusive behaviour becomes his problem-solving skill. This is a very dangerous pattern for a child to develop.
How Defiance Develops in Your Child
When we raise our children, we are teaching them 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, whether we think they’re learning from us or not. Children watch adults for a living. What parents don’t always understand is that chronic defiance in children develops over time, after certain lessons are learned and it can start very early on.
Let’s take the case of a child who was a fairly normal baby. He’s achieved all the developmental milestones, was perhaps a little cranky at times, but generally, behaved age-appropriately. As he gets a little older, he starts having more problems. At about the age of five, he begins to balk at the idea of picking up after himself, whether it’s his dirty clothes going into the hamper or toys with which he’s been playing. If he’s told to clean things in his room, he goes to the living room instead of complying. When asked to finish the task at hand, he says, “I don’t want to,” and that becomes his battle cry. His parents have to stand over him to get anything done. As he gets older, he starts to challenge and justify, his voice gets louder and his tone gets rougher. He gets stuck in the loop of saying, “I don’t want to. I don’t have to. I’ll do it later. Why do I have to do it now?” When pushed, he will do things grudgingly, but only when adults are watching him. And as soon as they leave the room, his compliance stops.
Some parents will respond to this behaviour by lowering their expectations. They place less responsibility on their child to pick up after himself. They wind up picking up his dirty clothes every day and picking up his books and toys, rather than dealing with his resistance, excuses and thinking errors. They think it’s easier and keeps the peace if they just to “do it themselves.”
For the parents, this can seem like a really good way to cut down on the fighting. After all, it only takes them 30 seconds to put the books away and pick up their child’s laundry. By the way, that’s a very common response and in some cases, it works out fine. But there are certain children who see that their parents have changed their rules and expectations because they fear their child’s resistance and acting out.
These are the children for whom capitulation on the part of the parents becomes a lesson. The lesson is, “If I throw a tantrum and scream at my mother and father, I’m going to get my way.” For these children, what tends to happen is that they start throwing more tantrums, yelling more frequently and using these inappropriate behaviours to solve their social problems.
Very early in life, children have to learn to deal with the word “no.” They have to learn the feelings of frustration or anger that are triggered when they hear it. In that way, being told “no” is a social problem that they have to solve. Most children develop the social skills of managing the feelings that are triggered when they’re denied something. But when the children I’m talking about are told “no” in a department store, their behaviour escalates until they’re tantruming. And what tends to happen over time is that parents read the signals: they see that the behaviour is escalating, and they try to do something about it before the tantrum begins. In other words, as the child gives them cues that he’s going to soon lose control if they keep placing the same demands on him, they lessen their demands. That lowering of expectations usually occurs by over-negotiating, compromising, or giving in to their child’s demands. In this way, these kids learn to shape the behaviour of the adults around them. Make no bones about it, when parents change their routine because a child throws a tantrum, or verbally abuses them, they’re teaching that child that he can have power over them through inappropriate behaviour. And once again, it’s not a lesson lost on that child.
While that’s going on, there’s a parallel process in which the parents are learning, as well. That lesson is, “If the child is given into, he stops tantruming and stops acting out.” For most parents, stopping the acting out is important because its embarrassing and frustrating. And so the parents are taught by the child that if they do what he wants, things will get easier, and if they don’t hold him accountable, even at 24 months, he’ll stop yelling and having temper tantrums. Parents learn to tolerate more inappropriate, acting-out behaviour from the child. I call it “Parents raising their tolerance for deviance.” And those two processes, separate though parallel, build on each other and form the child’s way of dealing with life.
Of course, as the child gets older, tantrums take on a very different look. Since lying on the floor and screaming and kicking your feet makes kids feel embarrassed when they reach a certain age, they learn various forms of verbal abuse, including name-calling, putting others down, and threatening. They enter kindergarten and try to throw tantrums or fight with their teachers, and then wonder why they aren’t allowed to get away with things in school. Many times, they have problems getting along with other kids. When you think about it, the sandbox is a very commonsense place. If your child is in the sandbox with other kids and he’s yelling at them and calling them names or threatening to hurt them, they won’t play with him anymore—that’s all there is to it. And if your child is using inappropriate behaviour as a way to get his way, the other kids are going to avoid him. If they have no choice but to accommodate him, once again he will fail to develop appropriate social skills. The lesson that he can get his way by verbally abusing others is reinforced.
So the intimidation between that child and his parents, and between that child and his peers, can start pretty early. Remember that there might be any number of reasons why a child is acting out and unable to handle the difficulties life presents: he might not learn to solve problems effectively because he has a neurological impairment like ADHD, an undiagnosed learning disability, a chaotic family life, or just a personal tendency to be oppositional. The acting-out child then enters adolescence and is a teen whose only problem-solving skills are to talk back abusively, put others down and curse at them, threaten to break things, or even use physical violence. One of the theories of The Total Transformation Program is that it doesn’t really matter what prevents your child from learning how to solve problems—rather, it’s his inability to do this that leads to the inappropriate behaviour. This includes the use of power thrusts like verbal abuse, physical intimidation and assault.
The truth is, it’s a core part of our job as parents to teach our children problem-solving skills and to show them that tantrums, screaming, yelling and name-calling, verbal abuse and intimidation will not solve their problems. The reason why we need to step in and help them change their ineffective way of dealing with life’s problems is because the more we give power to inappropriate, verbally abusive, behaviour the less prepared that child is going to be to solve life’s problems as an adult. Make no mistake about it, children who use verbal abuse, name-calling, cursing and intimidation, become verbally abusive adults.

Regards
Jay Vosloo

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